Papers

The following papers illustrate our ability in different aspects of practicing Systems Engineering.

Teaching Old Dogs New Tricks

Phil Brown and Robert A. Bardo

INCOSE Proceedings, 2005

Abstract: Downsizing, and consolidation of previously independent companies, has produced a clash of cultures in many companies. The problem is exacerbated by "home-grown" product development cultures that have been around for decades and often fail to adequately integrate new disciplines such as software engineering and systems engineering.

Over the years, the pace and complexity of technological development has increased. Mergers have brought together more companies with differing processes. New standards like the Software-Capability Maturity Model® (SW-CMMI®) and Capability Maturity Model Integration® (CMMI®) have been introduced. All these changes have increased the need for developing and instituting new, integrated, and more repeatable engineering processes. Methods of introducing, and gaining acceptance of, these new processes are becoming very important to the continued competitiveness of many companies.

At issue is how best to get a diverse workforce to work together to achieve extraordinary goals. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control (LMMFC), faced with integrating two former competitors, embarked in 1999 on a course to develop a common product development culture. A primary forcing function was the use of Carnegie Mellon University's Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®) standard. The resulting new processes are enabling employees to achieve higher goals -- by increasing productivity, maximizing use of information, using proven simplified processes, increasing re-use, and decreasing re-work. Results to date indicate a "One Company, One Team" mentality is rapidly becoming the norm at LMMFC

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The Value of Adding Digital Print Technology to Existing IPDT Collaboration Systems

Phil Brown, Frank Kuchelmeister and Jack Lavender

INCOSE Proceedings, 2001

Abstract: Timely and reliable information exchange is a hallmark of successful collaborative product development endeavors. The continuing challenge for organizations seeking to improve productivity is how to select and deploy technologies providing that provide the best return on their investment. This paper documents the process one that LMMFC-D (Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control Systems-Dallas)division followed in selecting digital print technology to improve Integrated Product Development Teams (IPDT) performance across several programs. Cost benefit results are included.

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Exploiting Web-Based Technology to Foster IPDT Productivity

Phil Brown and Jack Lavender

INCOSE Proceedings, 1999

Abstract: Very few organizations are able to show a "bottom line" impact directly attributable to investments in information technology. While many reasons are postulated for this failure to produce measurable improvements, a large part of the solution appears to be getting the user involved in defining requirements, identifying cost benefits, and implementing reengineered product development processes.

This approach was tried and validated for the Integrated Product Development Team (IPDT) on which it was applied. The product was a ground based weapon system. Results of the experiment exceeded expectations. Utilization of the systems engineering process was an essential element in making this a successful endeavor.

Described herein is the process by which IPDT perspectives were changed, the role of cost benefit analysis, results obtained, and what was learned about transforming a well-established culture.

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Virtual Prototyping: Results Illustrate Utility in Developing Weapon System Requirements

Phil Brown and Jack Lavender

INCOSE Proceedings, 1996

Abstract: Very few organizations are able to show a "bottom line" impact directly attributable to investments in information technology. While many reasons are postulated for this failure to produce measurable improvements, a large part of the solution appears to be getting the user involved in defining requirements, identifying cost benefits, and implementing reengineered product development processes.

This approach was tried and validated for the Integrated Product Development Team (IPDT) on which it was applied. The product was a ground based weapon system. Results of the experiment exceeded expectations. Utilization of the systems engineering process was a key element in making this a successful endeavor.

Described herein is the process by which IPDT perspectives were changed, the role of cost benefit analysis, results obtained, and what was learned about transforming a well-established culture.

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Improving the System Software Requirements Development Process

Phillip J. Brown, Alexander E. Iwach, Donald R. Williams

NCOSE Proceedings, 1994

Abstract: One of the most significant challenges currently facing the system engineering profession is devising procedures for improving the system software requirements development process. While many practitioners promote a variety of automated tools and mechanistic templates as the means to improved productivity, experience suggests the highest leverage lies in harnessing the cognitive processes required to produce a stable set of well defined system software requirements. System complexity and schedule constraints necessitate the use of teams of specialists working together to produce the desired software requirements database. System engineering's primary responsibilities are to foster team acceptance of a shared vision through the identification of intermediate and final products supporting the software requirements development process. This paper describes a framework for accomplishing the above, illustrates key points with actual examples, and identifies three approaches for improving management understanding of the requirements and software development processes.

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